About your Search

20121108
20121116
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27
of fiscal resources and the state of our economy. i'm not a foreign policy guy or a strategic guy, but that seems, obviously, right to me. if you can't aboard the kind of military you need to project power, if you can't afford to fund the state department in the kinds of ways it should be doing, no matter how many people we have or how wealthy some of our citizens are. i don't worry, if you don't mind my digressing slightly, i don't worry about china being a bigger economy than we are. i don't honestly care how big china is. they do have three-and-a-half times more people than we do. i'm more concerned with how big we are -- >> how big or how rich? >> well, i put them in the same -- rich being gdp. how successful are we economically. um, and so i do think it is, i think resolving the fiscal thing is of essential importance to our business community in terms of deciding how much they're going to spend, where they're going to invest, how many people they're going to hire and, therefore, to our position in the world. not just the problem of our debt and deficit, but unless we, unless
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evident by the remotely standing crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president, transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the are presidential cycle to impact the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where as necessary, seeks con fir nation, goes through reassessment, definition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrates to the changes, or as people say, the lack of changes, here in washington. at t
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
in foreign policy appetite in national security both on the part of the two parties and on the part of the american public. what do i mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia or continuing the land war in asia we have in afghanistan and we saw in the concluded presidential campaigns that the candidate who had a wing of the party pushing to take the view we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more, something militarily in iran but continually pushed away from that by the more politically minded wing of the party reading internal polling that says there's not much difference on afghanistan between republicans and democrats so you don't have the demand side for the kind of military spending we have seen over the last decade and no longer have public outcry from military spending as a response to terrorism. the second point related to that which is a two edged sword is the public believes that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem and the most obvious exponents of this is drones and other remote wrote --
sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for sometime. as the president's new or old team takes shape, and where necessary, seeks confirmation, as the new old team goes through the inevidentble period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and not forget as the world recalibrates changes or
an audience. you know, when you are the president's foreign policy spokesman and you are hanging out and have the israeli prime minister and then the chairman trying to reach a middle east peace, you go, okay, what we tell the press? and you say, you can tell them whatever you want except for this and that. and what else is there? [laughter] but now we have dennis ross was out of government. and he is writing a new book. when you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with iran, whether the nuclear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. in 2009 when you were at the state department as the special envoy forswore wrong, there was a strategy of both engagement and pressure. going back to 2009 there is the engagement that has continued at a certain level through the five plus one process, but then there has been focused over the last couple of years on pressure sanctions and the 40% drop in iranian currency shows that we now have the pressure of the last couple
" editorial page, she had a keen focus on foreign policy and in particular, really to to the issue of north korea human rights, like really no one else in the american media has taken. in her early career, melanie spent 10 years working for "the wall street journal" asia. in hong kong and before that had another gig, where she lived and worked in tokyo i believe. melanie received her bachelor's degree from princeton university and a master's degree from the university of toronto. the book that melanie is written is absolutely riveting. it really reads more like an tom clancy thriller than it does the work of nonfiction. she tells an incredibly powerful story about human rights and human tragedy the earliest modern north korea. she tells the story through the eyes of many of the participants in this drama. the refugees, one of whom, joseph can come into today, one of only 175, 180 north korean refugees who actually made it to the united states and safety. she tells the story through the eyes of the workers on the underground railroad, largely people involved in christian relief organizations
has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy and we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff for swimming and that's not making any predictions, but it's just useful to see where we are and the election results do have implications for some of the concerns we outlined in this report. i think i'll turn it over to computer for remarks. >> michael, good introduction. let me start -- in fact, i went to showcase the end of this month. it will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about that america was the way that lack america is thinking about the u.s. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now that the president elect of mexico to come to the united states before the inauguration. calderon did, fox did. i don't remember back further than that, but i was too young then. in any event, the visit itself opens up just a huge number of opportunities that probably existed -- i d
of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as the special envoy for ron there was a strategy, both engagement. go back to 2009. the engagement has continued at a certain level, but then there has been the focus over the last couple of years on pressure, sanctions, and clearly the 40% drop in the value of a running currencies shows that actually is having t
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
of foreign policy. a runaway train. most of the assistance programs need to have much more scrutiny overseen by the state department's broader foreign policy. >> i think we have had the discussion of why a military sequester might be well command for good reasons and i want to thank the audience for paying close attention and panelists for their presentations. >> more now from a new america foundation forum on the so-called fiscal cliff. over the next hour and 10 minutes a discussion about automatic budget cuts benefiting social programs. >> i am vice president of the economic policy center for american progress and i will be moderating this panel. i caught a bit of the last panel and we will be moving from guns to butter i guess or something. as we talk about how we are going to deal with the fiscal cliff, whether or it will be a grand bargain or models through or whatever happens, there are a number of programs that are undoubtedly going to get particular attention, really hot potatoes. they are programs that are very much the public is very aware of and things very much in the political d
to foreign policy. years later he told her he can enter in a series of interviews that pat always handled herself very properly, even the sensitive diplomatic conversation that she might inadvertently overhear. he explained that she listened and nodded but never me, sever him. at the same time, he relied on the thing he did not because i think that it was very observant. a small diplomatic tasks also provided nixon with cover it demanded more of a government policy. she was a woman he could trust to do what he expected to do. traveling did more than desired or adventure of visiting new places. it was way of reconnecting with the husband. she had never been more a part of his life and work them when they travel together traina vice presidential years. certainly circumstances have changed. now they travel the huge entourage and feeling towards the u.s. hardened over the year. the ability demonstrated by the blindness by yourself must've got a fighter. in 1970, epitomized her value as a foreign ambassador. 1970 and earthquake measuring 7.75 on the wreck or scale devastated parts of peru, kil
from the increasingly vocal feminists who demanded more of a role in government policy. she was a woman he could trust to do only what he expected her to do. pat's foreign traveling did more than feed her desire for a venture visiting new places, it was a way of reconnecting with her husband and the team of old. he had never been more a part of his life and work than when they traveled together during the vice-presidential years. the circumstances unchanged. now they traveled with a huge entourage of aides, security personnel and reporters and feelings toward the u.s. had hardened over the years but her husband's faith and her abilities demonstrated by his willingness to send her off by herself must have gratified her. ec's the opportunities to prove herself. her trip to peru in 1970 he penalize her value as a foreign ambassador. on may 31st, 1970, and earthquake measuring 7.75 on the richter scale devastated half of peru killing at least 50,000 people and displacing hundreds of thousands of others. mudslides followed the initial quake causing further damage. homeless, injured and starv
the development of his thinking about the organization, about grand strategy in u.s. foreign policy. not all of that made it into the book. some of it ended up on the cutting room floor, but that could be in my dissertation and perhaps i will finish it. we could see at various points what he was thinking at a certain point and then see how that's playing out. in the summer of june 2000 and 1 general mcchrystal said i remember sitting on the couch watching television and watching the faces flashed across the flu could possibly face him. and they said oh, no they will never sent him. but as we could train chapter one of the book, the army knew that his name is probably in the hat even though the media was not speculating about it at the time. yet received a call from mcchrystal when the rolling storm stone article broke. he was pretty sure that he had received some article that were causing the lose his job. and he was told that he was pretty likely to be selected for afghanistan. he was at the white house for a regularly scheduled meeting, but someone from the oval office came down and says t
-line foreign policy issues including syria and iran, but also some of the others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber ducky on your catalogs that you're looking at today. >> and we appreciate that. it helps pay our salaries. [laughter] i think bob corker's going to be pretty interesting as the ranking member on foreign relations. he spent the -- he skipped the republican convention the this summer to go to the middle east, you know? and he's been doing a lot of traveling. he's super smart about these kinds of things. and i think that he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely -- like dick lieu bar, honestly. -- lugar, honestly. and he'll be against the hawk as, i think, on a number of occasions. he did a story recently about him, and we had john mccain talking about how much he respected him even though they don't always see eye to eye. but i will say this, i think that, um, the foreign relations panels in both chambers, um, you know, since i guess the '60s really have just not had as much of an impact on what the president does as they, as they used to. um, now, if kerr
on his foreign policy and national security ajen -- agenda. he has confidence in the acting cia director, the military, the secretary of defense, and the defense department to carry out missions he's assigned to them, but he's got, obviously, a lot that he wants to get to work on, and he's doing that this week. >> broadly, how does that affect his need to advance the national security team? >> you know, again, i think these are specific questions about specific individuals and posts. i have no announcements to make with regard to personnel or speculations to engage in. the president has not decided on personnel manners, and you will not hear me discuss them until the president made the decisions and announced me. >> thank you. >> yeah. >> jay, you say they regard two specific people, two of the top military brass involved in an extramarital affair or inappropriate behavior. is the president all worry about an inappropriate culture in the military? >> i really would ask you to not extrapolate broadly. the president has confidence in the military, his commanders, and will continue to have
partisan than i thought it would be including matters on foreign policy. it felt it first on the debate of the resolution to authorize president bush to go into kuwait to get hussein out. along the way, there have been many great moments of bipartisan achievement, and, in fact, i would say that of all of things i'm feeling good about that i've been a part of in the 24 years i've been in the senate, not a one of them have been partisan. .. >> be effective that is that you get 0%. >> senator kyl what happened? why this happened? >> forgive me for doing this, but think you doing this and thank you to "the wall street journal" for making this possible. mr. murdoch, it's great have a chance to visit with you. mr. prime minister, i haven't had a chance to visit with him as of yet. he is very good at this. i'm thinking about running for reelection. [laughter] john mccain and joe lieberman. the reason that joe came back -- what a wonderful lady she is. >> have you finished your rounds? >> a have to do that because i do appreciate this opportunity. i came to the congress in 1972 as a young fresh
reality. now second, there has, in fact, been a significant shift in foreign policy appetite and national security appetite, both on the part of the two parties, and on the part of the american public. and what do we mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia, and there's no appetite for a continuing to lead were in asia that we've still got in afghanistan. and we just saw in the concluded presidential campaign that the candidate who had a wing of his party clergy pledging them to take the view that we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more in syria, that we should do something militarily and iran was continually pushed away from that by the more political politically minded wing of his party that was reading an internal polling which said, there's not much difference particularly on afghanistan it when republicans and democrats. so you don't have the demand side, if you will for the kind of military spending that we've seen over the last decade. you know longer have a public outcry for military spending on this scale as a response to terroris
in the christian conservative community. it does seem, to me, to have evolved. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the christian community is now or conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> yeah. i mean, we're still looking at the postelection survey that we, um, commissioned, that we got very early this morning, about 5 a.m. but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i've seen throughout my career, you know? there's a tendency to sort of caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and sort of suggest that they live in trailer parks, and they're poor, not educated and easy to command, and they cling to their guns and their religion, and they vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs by the exact same percentage that the entire electorate did. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the righteous and the unrighteous alike. so evangelicals and faithful catholics are underwater on their mortgages. they're also struggling. they're trying to
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
important foreign policy has become to them and particularly their strong support for the state of israel. i wouldn't say every mailing we send, just about every mailing we sent out mentioned either obama removing jerusalem from the capital of israel and reinserted it or mentioned his call for israel to return to 67 border or mentioned the fact that his administration had slow walked sanctions against iran. those issues have real resonance among them. >> jonathan is one of washington's most thoughtful journalists. he's been covering this steek or it for a long time, and thank you, ralph, for your excellents. he's the money and politics report enand the past president of the national prez club. what did you see yesterday what does it mean for the country and. >> well, in 2010, we saw the secret money in the races took control of the senate and house. and all service said, it's going to be a foreshadow in the 2012. it wasn't. obama was able to raise as much money with romney. romney had help with the super political action committees and outside groups. the money was even. obama wasn't swamped
and security a center of u.s. foreign policy debate. this was hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. >> let me take a employment to welcome and introduce admiral fallon skipping the part how he walked across the tidal basin to get here today. he's a very, very dear friend. he's had senior commands. he was, of course, the head of the central command, was the head of the pacific command. he was instrumental in opening up our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the, you know, the diplomat warrior, what we most admire in our unified combat and commanders. thank you, bill, to you, for doing this, and let's turn it over to you. >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] first big step. thank you very much, and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we're getting settled here, i'll have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs and order dessert, and those of you who missed the chow line, it may be too late. [laughter] then, again, i don't think too many in this room are starving, not the s
administrations to share information with those of us that are supposed to make critical foreign policy decisions and the budget process. very unwilling, and certainly this is another case of the. but i was struck as well that, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at
how to use that. have you shape foreign policy? nothing is ever perfect but there is the realization but dead digital out reached team started and has been very aggressive. >> very interesting. most not associate the then diagram blending with radio free asia and of the broadcast network how we converse with the public we may not be receiving free or unfiltered news. then the conversation should it be news? . .
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)